Supporting Quality English Teaching

Grammar Teaching Focus

Grammar Teaching Focus

Grammar Teaching Focus

Hi Teachers - welcome back!

Third conditional

Today I’ve called on Britsh Council Poland’s Language Doctor, Anthony Smyth, to share an interesting activity I saw him planning for an Upper Intermediate group.

Read through the Language Doctor’s activity, have a look at another suggestion on Teaching English here, and then share your favourite teaching ideas for this grammar point.

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Best wishes from me (Rebecca) and now over to you Doctor.

Anthony Smyth – the Language Doctor Download PDF File here.

When students hear the word ‘grammar’, they scream; when they hear the word ‘conditionals’, they simply run away! Stop! Don’t run, stay with me here! Let’s tackle the 3rd conditional form. Get to know this and then you can create your own.

Classroom Activity

1. Identify the third conditional structure (WB):

If + past perfect, 2nd modal form + have + 3rd form

2. Let students check out these examples (WB):

a. If Daniel hadn’t gone to the party, he wouldn’t have met his future wife.

b. If the dog hadn’t looked into the box, the hamster wouldn’t have bitten it’s nose!

c. If Mildred had studied harder, she might have passed the exam.

d. If Adam had played properly with his tablet, he wouldn’t have broken it.

3.  On the WB, nominate a student to highlight the verb form in each part.

4. Lead them in identifying the time frame for each sentence: they all refer to past time.

5. Guide them towards understanding the truth of each situation; use these concept questions to help:

a. Did Daniel go to the party? Yes      Did he meet his future wife there? Yes

b. Did the dog look in the box? Yes      Did the hamster bite it on the nose? Yes

c. Did Mildred study hard enough? No      Did she pass the exam? No

d. Did Adam play properly with his tablet? No       Did he break it? Yes

Help them notice that the true situation is the opposite to what they read/say.  ‘hadn’t gone’ => went: ‘hadn’t looked’ =>looked: ‘wouldn’t have met’ => met, etc

6. Show a picture – elicit key vocabulary – help the class build a 3rd conditional sentence.

7. Show another picture, pairs work on producing a 3rd conditional.

The whole class get to choose which sentence they like best.

8. In threes now. Show two more pictures (Wb or stuck on the wall) and groups build a sentence for each.

9. Next, one member of each group visits the other groups, telling them the two sentences they created. The ‘listeners’ note the speaker and secretly score the sentences they hear for grammatical accuracy [1 poor - 10 great] and creativity  [1 poor - 10 great]

10. The teacher collects the scores relating to each group and gets feedback. Prize for the best group!

What are your third conditional ideas, share them below. 

From Anthony Smyth a.k.a The Language Doctor

Ujarzmiając okresy warunkowe! – Szczyt zbyt trudny do zdobycia?

Gdy studenci słyszą słowo “gramatyka”, krzyczą. Gdy słyszą „okresy warunkowe”, uciekają!

Zaczekajcie! Stawmy czoło trzeciemu okresowi warunkowemu. Poznajcie mój sposób, a później stwórzcie swój własny.

Procedura:

1. Przedstaw strukturę 3 okresu warunkowego (zapisz na tablicy):

If + past perfect, 2nd modal form + have + 3rd form

2. Pozwól uczniom zapoznać się z podanymi przykładami:

a. If Daniel hadn’t gone to the party, he wouldn’t have met his future wife.

b. If the dog hadn’t looked into the box, the hamster wouldn’t have bitten its nose!

c. If Mildred had studied harder, she might have passed the exam.

d. If Adam had played properly with his tablet, he wouldn’t have broken it.

3. Wybierz uczniów do podkreślenia na tablicy form czasownikowych w każdym zdaniu.

4. Pomóż im w zidentyfikowaniu czasu w każdym z przykładów: wszystkie odnoszą się do przeszłości.

5. Spróbuj ułatwić uczniom zrozumienie znaczenia każdego ze zdań. Użyj poniższych pytań:

a. Did Daniel go to the party? Yes      Did he meet his future wife there? Yes

b. Did the dog look in the box? Yes      Did the hamster bite it on the nose? Yes

c. Did Mildred study hard enough? No      Did she pass the exam? No

d. Did Adam play properly with his tablet? No       Did he break it? Yes

Pomóż im zauważyć, że prawdziwa sytuacja jest odwrotna do tego co dosłownie oznacza tłumaczenie czasowników: ‘hadn’t gone’ => went: ‘hadn’t looked’ => looked: ‘wouldn’t have met’ => met, etc

6. Pokaż uczniom zdjęcie – powtórz, przypomnij słownictwo – pomóż klasie zbudować zdania w 3 okresie warunkowym.

(np. zdjęcie przedstawiające elegancką kobietę opierająca się o balustradę)

7. Pokaż kolejne zdjęcie. Uczniowie w parach tworzą zdania w 3 okresie warunkowym.  Klasa wspólnie wybiera najciekawsze zdanie.

8. Następnie podziel uczniów na trójki, przedstaw kolejne dwa zdjęcia (powieś na tablicy lub ścianie) i poproś uczniów, aby tworzyli zdania do każdego ze zdjęć.

9. Wybrany przedstawiciel każdej z grup odwiedza inne grupy i prezentuje swoje zdania. „Słuchacze”zapisują i oceniają zdania (1słabo – 10 świetnie).

10. Nauczyciel zbiera wyniki każdej z grup i nagradza zwycięzców.

Comments

Total 4 Comments Add your comment

Pawel

Posted on March 25th, 2013 Report abuse

Not necessarily for 3rd Conditional, but nice activty on LearnEnglishTeens on unreal conditionals http://learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org/freetime/video-zone/black-holes ENJOY

Monika Bayer-Berry

Posted on March 25th, 2013 Report abuse

This activity may be used to practise 3rd conditional but it may also be used to practise all of them. I prepare sheets of paper with one sentence on each of them (different sentence for each student), e.g. If I hadn’t been born in Poland, I wouldn’t have met my friends. All the sentences can be written in 3rd conditional or you may use a variety. Then I ask my students to write a sentence underneath the first sentence. It has to be written in the same conditional as the previous one and it has to start the way the previous one ended, e.g. If I hadn’t met my friends, I wouldn’t have gone to the party last night. When they finish, they fold the piece of paper so that the next student can only see the last sentence and then pass the paper to the person on their right. It continues until each student receive their original piece of paper. Then I ask my students to make a sentence: they take the first part of the first sentence and the last part of the last sentence. They check if it’s grammatically correct, and then read it out loud. Students enjoy it as some of the sentences are really funny. We usually vote for the funniest one and then, as a follow-up activity at home, I ask the students to rewrite all the sentences on their piece of paper, correcting all the mistakes.

Ricky Krzyzewski

Posted on March 25th, 2013 Report abuse

I invented a really cool activity I like to call ‘Scenarios’. It takes students who have already been exposed to the 3rd conditional’s form and gets them forming the sentences ‘on the spot’ in a live mingling.
I illustrate some very simple past ‘scenarios’ using the construction PAST SIMPLE + BECAUSE + PAST SIMPLE. The simpler the better.
“Bob was sick BECAUSE he ate too much.”
“Mary lost her job BECAUSE she was always late.”

I always encourage them to be as elementary as possible. Students then mingle around the room reading their sentences to each other while trying to repeat back their classmates’ sentences as a 3rd conditional.
MACIEJ:’Bob was sick BECAUSE he ate too much.’
KUBA: ‘Well…if he hadn’t eaten so much he wouldn’t have been sick.’
It encourages thinking on your feet and gets students moving around.

Rebecca Mason, Senior Teacher Quality

Posted on March 26th, 2013 Report abuse

@ Pawel – the video is really high quality and looks at many different grammar points. Do you have any other LearnEnglishTeen activities you have used? Thanks for this and welcome to the blog :-)

@ Monika Bayer-Berry – this chain conditional activity sounds like lots of fun and must get some hilarious results. Similar to my question in a previous blog post you commented on – what is the youngest age of students you have tried this activity on?

@ Ricky Krzyzewski This sounds good, which level would you start using this activity with? It sounds like it would require lots of concentration. Do you monitor and give feedback or do you nominate students to be the ‘checkers’? Thanks for your input :-)